TVO: “Waghdad”.

27 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
Originally posted on Ad Hoc "Waghdad“ is one of the "Six Cities of the Red Night", which play a central part in William S. Burroughs’ 1981 novel of the same name. Inspired by the literary work, Glasgow musician Ruaridh Law aka TVO (The Village Orchestra) has created Red Night, a 58-minute piece of drone, menacing noise, and subdued proto-techno that revolves around the dystopian themes laid out by the author: the indeterminacy of time and loss of memory. Law’s hauntological approach to composition, which might be compared to that of Manchester-based contemporaries Demdike Stare, is able to expose the uncanny and sinister subtexts of purportedly familiar structures, as best exemplified in “Waghdad”, one of Red Night’s center pieces. The slowly creeping, loosely textured track falls into a raw, stripped-down version of a late night dancefloor filler, leaving too much room for anxiety between its unobtrusive yet relentless 4/4 kicks to let the listener remain calm and collected. Red Night is out July 2 on Law's own Broken60. Read more → Originally posted on Ad Hoc "Waghdad“ is one of the "Six Cities of the Red Night", which play a central part in William S. Burroughs’ 1981 novel of the same name. Inspired by the literary work, Glasgow musician Ruaridh Law aka TVO (The Village Orchestra) has created Red Night, a 58-minute piece of drone, menacing noise, and subdued proto-techno that revolves around the dystopian themes laid out by the author: the indeterminacy of time and loss of memory. Law’s hauntological approach to composition, which might be compared to that of Manchester-based contemporaries Demdike Stare, is able to expose the uncanny and sinister subtexts of purportedly familiar structures, as best exemplified in “Waghdad”, one of Red Night’s center pieces. The slowly creeping, loosely textured track falls into a raw, stripped-down version of a late night dancefloor filler, leaving too much room for anxiety between its unobtrusive yet relentless 4/4 kicks to let the listener remain calm and collected. Red Night is out July 2 on Law's own Broken60.

Dean Blunt: “Flaxen”.

27 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
Here's (apparently) a new one by Dean Blunt, strangely captivating as usual yet quite different from the last transmissions of one half of our favorite outré art duo Hype Williams. No further comment or information, of course, but it seems to be part of Blunt's forthcoming Narcissist III, the follow-up to this brilliant mixtape from February which included one of our favorite tunes of 2012, "Choice of a New Generation". Check it out below and be quick, who knows how long it's gonna stay on Soundcloud. Read more → Here's (apparently) a new one by Dean Blunt, strangely captivating as usual yet quite different from the last transmissions of one half of our favorite outré art duo Hype Williams. No further comment or information, of course, but it seems to be part of Blunt's forthcoming Narcissist III, the follow-up to this brilliant mixtape from February which included one of our favorite tunes of 2012, "Choice of a New Generation". Check it out below and be quick, who knows how long it's gonna stay on Soundcloud.

Digitalis Recs: Born Again for the First Time.

27 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
Tulsa, Oklahoma's Digitalis Recordings, not only one of our favorite labels, but without doubt also one of the most important for us and the evolution of NFOP, just announced the launch of their new, completely redesigned website, and we have to say it's looking awesome. To be totally honest, yes, their old version indeed looked a bit outdated since, well, 2006 or something, but hey, the folks clearly focused their energy on stellar curating, so we would've never even thought of complaining. What's more, Digitalis is celebrating the occasion with a massive 23-track compilation for y'all to digest, gathering som many exclusives by so many NFOP favs that we won't even start mentioning them. Just check out Born Again for the First Time below and head over to bandcamp to download the whole thing for free. Yes, it's that amazing. Read more → Tulsa, Oklahoma's Digitalis Recordings, not only one of our favorite labels, but without doubt also one of the most important for us and the evolution of NFOP, just announced the launch of their new, completely redesigned website, and we have to say it's looking awesome. To be totally honest, yes, their old version indeed looked a bit outdated since, well, 2006 or something, but hey, the folks clearly focused their energy on stellar curating, so we would've never even thought of complaining. What's more, Digitalis is celebrating the occasion with a massive 23-track compilation for y'all to digest, gathering som many exclusives by so many NFOP favs that we won't even start mentioning them. Just check out Born Again for the First Time below and head over to bandcamp to download the whole thing for free. Yes, it's that amazing.

Video Premiere: Ensemble Economique - “Radiate THROUGH Me”.

27 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
As reported before, French imprint Hands In The Dark has gathered two of America's finest experimental musicians, Lee Noble and Brian Pyle aka Ensemble Economique, to fill both sides of Motion Forever, one of those split LPs that actually make a whole lot of sense. We've already featured Noble's "Woman in the Dunes" and Pyle's "Your Hands, Your Lips, Your EYES, Your Hips” back in May and premiered the former's stellar track "Memory Photo". Today we're happy to present the brand new video for the other Ensemble Economique track on the LP, "Radiate THROUGH Me", which you could first hear over on Decoder - and if you found the piece's looming darkness somehow disturbing, you should probably avoid watching the accompanying visuals, which were masterfully assembled by video artist Pik using footage from two Shozin Fukui movies, "Rubber's Lover" and "Gerorisuto". A perfectly fitting, thoroughly unsettling collage. Motion Forever is out now. Get it over here. Stream the whole LP below: Read more → As reported before, French imprint Hands In The Dark has gathered two of America's finest experimental musicians, Lee Noble and Brian Pyle aka Ensemble Economique, to fill both sides of Motion Forever, one of those split LPs that actually make a whole lot of sense. We've already featured Noble's "Woman in the Dunes" and Pyle's "Your Hands, Your Lips, Your EYES, Your Hips” back in May and premiered the former's stellar track "Memory Photo". Today we're happy to present the brand new video for the other Ensemble Economique track on the LP, "Radiate THROUGH Me", which you could first hear over on Decoder - and if you found the piece's looming darkness somehow disturbing, you should probably avoid watching the accompanying visuals, which were masterfully assembled by video artist Pik using footage from two Shozin Fukui movies, "Rubber's Lover" and "Gerorisuto". A perfectly fitting, thoroughly unsettling collage. Motion Forever is out now. Get it over here. Stream the whole LP below:

DIIV: “Oshin”.

27 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
When the news spread last fall that Beach Fossils member Zachary Cole Smith had started a new band named Dive, I belonged to the (substantial) faction of skeptics as I couldn't avoid feeling that the time for light-hearted beach pop bands had been over since late 2010, and the group's first tune "Sometime" kinda reconfirmed my initial suspicions. However, now that Dive is DIIV and I've listened to the whole debut album Oshin a couple of times, I happily admit that I was wrong: the record has a summery feel, yes, but it's also very diverse and draws on so many different influences that the cheap label "beach pop" certainly wouldn't do justice to it. In fact, it's definitely my favorite guitar album of 2012 so far, and I warmly recommend it. I've written a few more things about it over on Ad Hoc yesterday, if you feel inclined to check that out, but in any case I recommend listening to the two songs below, "How Long Have You Known" and "Doused", that taken together give a pretty good impression of what I've been trying to say as regards Oshin's variety, the latter being considerably darker, edgier than the former, which is indeed rather sunny and closer to Beach Fossils' oeuvre. Oshin is out now on Captured Tracks. Read more → When the news spread last fall that Beach Fossils member Zachary Cole Smith had started a new band named Dive, I belonged to the (substantial) faction of skeptics as I couldn't avoid feeling that the time for light-hearted beach pop bands had been over since late 2010, and the group's first tune "Sometime" kinda reconfirmed my initial suspicions. However, now that Dive is DIIV and I've listened to the whole debut album Oshin a couple of times, I happily admit that I was wrong: the record has a summery feel, yes, but it's also very diverse and draws on so many different influences that the cheap label "beach pop" certainly wouldn't do justice to it. In fact, it's definitely my favorite guitar album of 2012 so far, and I warmly recommend it. I've written a few more things about it over on Ad Hoc yesterday, if you feel inclined to check that out, but in any case I recommend listening to the two songs below, "How Long Have You Known" and "Doused", that taken together give a pretty good impression of what I've been trying to say as regards Oshin's variety, the latter being considerably darker, edgier than the former, which is indeed rather sunny and closer to Beach Fossils' oeuvre. Oshin is out now on Captured Tracks.

Erika Spring: “Hidden (Jensen Sportag Remix)”.

26 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
Everyone's favorite pop label Cascine continues with its staggering string of phenomenal releases, this time with some unanticipated solo adventures of Au Revoir Simone's Erika Forster aka Erika Spring. We kinda missed out on the release of her first single "Hidden" recently, a lapse we'd like to apologize for, but even the relentlessness that is the blogosphere sometimes unveils its gentle side by giving out second chances for selected websites, so we're here, right on time, to present you the perfect aural summer cocktail that is the remix of the track by Cascine's very own Jensen Sportag. Just don't forget to put a slice of orange on top. You're welcome. Erika Spring's self-titled debut EP is out July 10 on Cascine. Check out the blissful original, too: Read more → Everyone's favorite pop label Cascine continues with its staggering string of phenomenal releases, this time with some unanticipated solo adventures of Au Revoir Simone's Erika Forster aka Erika Spring. We kinda missed out on the release of her first single "Hidden" recently, a lapse we'd like to apologize for, but even the relentlessness that is the blogosphere sometimes unveils its gentle side by giving out second chances for selected websites, so we're here, right on time, to present you the perfect aural summer cocktail that is the remix of the track by Cascine's very own Jensen Sportag. Just don't forget to put a slice of orange on top. You're welcome. Erika Spring's self-titled debut EP is out July 10 on Cascine. Check out the blissful original, too:

Premiere: Gobby - “Seagate”.

26 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
We have no clue who the person behind Gobby might be, all we know is that he (oh, we do know that, too) hails from Harlem, so far not notorious for being a hotbed for deep and dark yet immensely playful techno. For what it's worth, with the menacing 4/4 assault that is "Seagate", he could just as well be a citizen of Neukölln, but it is here that we stop with our tiresome pre-internet age clichés. However, we've been told that Gobby's new EP New Hat, of which this track forms a part, is a direct result of the elusive producer's fresh Detroit/Berghain phase, which hints at a mind that is not satisfied with the exploration of a single genre - a good thing, we'd like to add. In fact, it has been suggested that this phase might be over again already. In any case, "Seagate" is here and now, in more than one sense indeed, as is New Hat, which is one of this year's truly challenging and worthwhile efforts in its genre with all its affinity towards noise and broken rhythms that firmly places it somewhere between Actress and Kassem Mosse. Highly recommended. New Hat is out on 12 inch vinyl today on the stellar new(ish) imprint UNO. You may also get it digitally via Boomkat. Also check out the EP's terrific opening monster "Viewing HRS (Zzz)", which recently found a new home on Dummy: Update: As a special treat, here's also the video for "Seagate", dropped last night on Dazed and Confused: Read more → We have no clue who the person behind Gobby might be, all we know is that he (oh, we do know that, too) hails from Harlem, so far not notorious for being a hotbed for deep and dark yet immensely playful techno. For what it's worth, with the menacing 4/4 assault that is "Seagate", he could just as well be a citizen of Neukölln, but it is here that we stop with our tiresome pre-internet age clichés. However, we've been told that Gobby's new EP New Hat, of which this track forms a part, is a direct result of the elusive producer's fresh Detroit/Berghain phase, which hints at a mind that is not satisfied with the exploration of a single genre - a good thing, we'd like to add. In fact, it has been suggested that this phase might be over again already. In any case, "Seagate" is here and now, in more than one sense indeed, as is New Hat, which is one of this year's truly challenging and worthwhile efforts in its genre with all its affinity towards noise and broken rhythms that firmly places it somewhere between Actress and Kassem Mosse. Highly recommended. New Hat is out on 12 inch vinyl today on the stellar new(ish) imprint UNO. You may also get it digitally via Boomkat. Also check out the EP's terrific opening monster "Viewing HRS (Zzz)", which recently found a new home on Dummy: Update: As a special treat, here's also the video for "Seagate", dropped last night on Dazed and Confused:

Red Alder: “Methods”.

26 Jun 2012 — Henning Lahmann
When you've come across Kelsie Brown aka Red Alder's music before, here or here or somewhere else, then you already know that her music, sublimely beautiful as it invariably is, can be an unsettling listen, as if she tried to put all the world's sadness into a couple of minutes of notes and rests in order to banish it - of course, we've heard melancholic music before, but there's something about young Ms Brown's recital that leaves us devastated and shivering each and every single time. Yet still, "Methods", the last song from her new 11-song collection Hyper Vertical, appears even more forlorn than before - its structures are raw, sparse, and understated to a degree that it almost hurts. It is, in other words, a song that we find, on this very Tuesday morning, almost too sad to stand, but at the same time also almost too beautiful to believe. Hyper Vertical is out now. Get it here. Read more → When you've come across Kelsie Brown aka Red Alder's music before, here or here or somewhere else, then you already know that her music, sublimely beautiful as it invariably is, can be an unsettling listen, as if she tried to put all the world's sadness into a couple of minutes of notes and rests in order to banish it - of course, we've heard melancholic music before, but there's something about young Ms Brown's recital that leaves us devastated and shivering each and every single time. Yet still, "Methods", the last song from her new 11-song collection Hyper Vertical, appears even more forlorn than before - its structures are raw, sparse, and understated to a degree that it almost hurts. It is, in other words, a song that we find, on this very Tuesday morning, almost too sad to stand, but at the same time also almost too beautiful to believe. Hyper Vertical is out now. Get it here.