Weekly Retrospect 34/12

24 Aug 2012 — NFOP

A selection of tracks you should’ve been listening to this past week."Maul matches the track’s thunderous drums with shouts of desperation, hoarsely barking I see you everywhere that I turn" — Frances Capell, The Fader From Chrome Lips, out on August 28 via Dovecote/Mishka.“In this world, you think you have no reason to believe in love or in anything much. Then one day, when you least expect it, a light appears on the far horizon. It’s a flickering light, begging you to come, telling you to stay away. It’s the pale fire. The promise of love and hope – all consuming and elusive. Yet for a moment, it brings clarity in the darkness, future to the ruins and power to the fight." — Sarah Assbring of El Perro Del Mar From Pale Fire, out on November 12 in Europe (November 9 in Germany) via Memphis Industries."Everything they do here seems to prioritize maximizing emotion. Beats snap harder, toying with negative space to create depth; production is thoroghly textured but less dense" — Jenn Pelly, Pitchfork From Your Drums, Your Love, out on October 7 via Island."Here’s a new cut from Chad Valley, aka Jonquil’s Hugo Manuel, whose “Fall 4 U” comes beamed from the same kind of ’80s-y, Balearic Ibiza maximalism the Rapture channelled on In the Grace of Your Love, and features Glasser mastermind Cameron Mesirow - she trades off moody, lovestruck vocals with Manuel over a woozy, slow-burning beat of ethereal synths and clattering drum machine" — Genevieve Oliver, Pretty Much Amazing From Young Hunger, out in North America on October 30 via Cascine, and in Europe on November 19 via Loose Lips."'SAVE THE PLANET ♲ 100% pure H Y D R A T I O N : O2 REMIXED', sees BODYGUARD at their most sensory-overloaded, with sounds aimed at penetrating listeners from every which way, fluttering sensually and lovingly from behind HD flatscreens, from within the company Prius, from between lip-gloss’d lips, from a Hello Kitty spa in Dubai. Here, gun-cocks are replaced with unsheathing swords, hi-hats replaced with gasps, and snares replaced with an electronic blip, while an electric guitar wails in the postmodern lounge area. It’s sexualized ecology, aestheticized global warming, the sound of culture eating itself." — Mr P, Tiny Mix Tapes From HYDRATION ♲ : SAVE THE PLANET ☮, out in September via Hippos In Tanks."Glasgow producer Koreless has gone ahead and nixed the bass and glissando glitter of the original, training our ears on a light patter of a drum-beat and a melody that could have been ripped from a mechanical music box. As for Tom Krell’s falsetto, it’s been pitched down just below immediate recognition, sounding enough like Nina Simone’s trembling alto to make us feel pleasantly confused." — Emilie Friedlander, The Fader Total Loss is out September 17 via Weird World/Domino and in North America September 18 via Acéphale."[T]his latest track gestures at West African highlife guitars and the sturdy four-fours of funky house, finishing with the sort of epic synth boost that Martin Hannett would be proud of. Do not, in other words, sleep, because as nice guys as they are, they could take you in any way, mental, physical, animal, vegetable, mineral." — Charlie Robin Jones, Dummy From Like An Animal, out October 8 via Tough Love."The upbeat number recalls a laid back summer night spent drinking Budweiser Sprite with friends without a care in the world, even as the lyrics acknowledge the more bittersweet side of a budding relationship." — Emily Wheeler, Ad Hoc From the Work It Out 7 inch, out October 23 via Underwater Peoples/Chapter Music.

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A selection of tracks you should’ve been listening to this past week."Maul matches the track’s thunderous drums with shouts of desperation, hoarsely barking I see you everywhere that I turn" — Frances Capell, The Fader From Chrome Lips, out on August 28 via Dovecote/Mishka.“In this world, you think you have no reason to believe in love or in anything much. Then one day, when you least expect it, a light appears on the far horizon. It’s a flickering light, begging you to come, telling you to stay away. It’s the pale fire. The promise of love and hope – all consuming and elusive. Yet for a moment, it brings clarity in the darkness, future to the ruins and power to the fight." — Sarah Assbring of El Perro Del Mar From Pale Fire, out on November 12 in Europe (November 9 in Germany) via Memphis Industries."Everything they do here seems to prioritize maximizing emotion. Beats snap harder, toying with negative space to create depth; production is thoroghly textured but less dense" — Jenn Pelly, Pitchfork From Your Drums, Your Love, out on October 7 via Island."Here’s a new cut from Chad Valley, aka Jonquil’s Hugo Manuel, whose “Fall 4 U” comes beamed from the same kind of ’80s-y, Balearic Ibiza maximalism the Rapture channelled on In the Grace of Your Love, and features Glasser mastermind Cameron Mesirow - she trades off moody, lovestruck vocals with Manuel over a woozy, slow-burning beat of ethereal synths and clattering drum machine" — Genevieve Oliver, Pretty Much Amazing From Young Hunger, out in North America on October 30 via Cascine, and in Europe on November 19 via Loose Lips."'SAVE THE PLANET ♲ 100% pure H Y D R A T I O N : O2 REMIXED', sees BODYGUARD at their most sensory-overloaded, with sounds aimed at penetrating listeners from every which way, fluttering sensually and lovingly from behind HD flatscreens, from within the company Prius, from between lip-gloss’d lips, from a Hello Kitty spa in Dubai. Here, gun-cocks are replaced with unsheathing swords, hi-hats replaced with gasps, and snares replaced with an electronic blip, while an electric guitar wails in the postmodern lounge area. It’s sexualized ecology, aestheticized global warming, the sound of culture eating itself." — Mr P, Tiny Mix Tapes From HYDRATION ♲ : SAVE THE PLANET ☮, out in September via Hippos In Tanks."Glasgow producer Koreless has gone ahead and nixed the bass and glissando glitter of the original, training our ears on a light patter of a drum-beat and a melody that could have been ripped from a mechanical music box. As for Tom Krell’s falsetto, it’s been pitched down just below immediate recognition, sounding enough like Nina Simone’s trembling alto to make us feel pleasantly confused." — Emilie Friedlander, The Fader Total Loss is out September 17 via Weird World/Domino and in North America September 18 via Acéphale."[T]his latest track gestures at West African highlife guitars and the sturdy four-fours of funky house, finishing with the sort of epic synth boost that Martin Hannett would be proud of. Do not, in other words, sleep, because as nice guys as they are, they could take you in any way, mental, physical, animal, vegetable, mineral." — Charlie Robin Jones, Dummy From Like An Animal, out October 8 via Tough Love."The upbeat number recalls a laid back summer night spent drinking Budweiser Sprite with friends without a care in the world, even as the lyrics acknowledge the more bittersweet side of a budding relationship." — Emily Wheeler, Ad Hoc From the Work It Out 7 inch, out October 23 via Underwater Peoples/Chapter Music.

Weekly Retrospect 33/12

17 Aug 2012 — NFOP

A selection of tracks you should've been listening to this past week."Now Tom Krell has leant his fragile-yet-beautiful vocals to a moving rendition of Janet Jackson's "Again". The song hits me on some personal levels I'll spare you of, but regardless of how much you relate, there's just no denying that Krell manages to make you feel his woes. It's a strange and awesome power that he wields." — Jheri Evans, Decoder Total Loss is out September 17 via Weird World/Domino and in North America September 18 via Acéphale."With the first drum beat at 11 seconds and a delicate drop following, the powerful beats intoxicate; combine this with Bath’s dreamy vocals, here is a song of crushing emotion." — Francesca Davison, Dummy From Feel Me, out August 28 via Friends Of Friends."It's the kind of brogue that'd set adrenaline streaking through your body if you heard it yelling after you down a dark alleyway, but here, the only threat of violence manifests in the still-sore "wounds on [your] back." It's a tale of knowing better next time offset by Marshall's turning-trademark cockiness: all, "See, girl…" and dedications to an oblique old guard, the only lineage in which Marshall seeks to establish himself." — Laura Snapes, Pitchfork From the Rock Bottom/Octopus 7 inch, out September 24 via Rinse."[T]he first single from the band’s sophomore album is “Die Life,” an exhilarating burst of release-less tension that pairs a “She Lost Control” shuffle with a jacked tempo and animalistic melodies." — Self-titled Mag From Zeros, out September 30 via Captured Tracks."This is the most eccentric and mellow collection of tunes Traxman has released yet-- if the hypermanic lullaby of "Da World Around Us" and his rework of Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" are any clues-- but it's another, almost undeserved peak into the mind of a juke giant, as well as a precursor to his forthcoming release on Lit City Trax. We can't help but be grateful for it." — Brad Stabler, Ad Hoc From Heat, out on Sewage Tapes.

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A selection of tracks you should've been listening to this past week."Now Tom Krell has leant his fragile-yet-beautiful vocals to a moving rendition of Janet Jackson's "Again". The song hits me on some personal levels I'll spare you of, but regardless of how much you relate, there's just no denying that Krell manages to make you feel his woes. It's a strange and awesome power that he wields." — Jheri Evans, Decoder Total Loss is out September 17 via Weird World/Domino and in North America September 18 via Acéphale."With the first drum beat at 11 seconds and a delicate drop following, the powerful beats intoxicate; combine this with Bath’s dreamy vocals, here is a song of crushing emotion." — Francesca Davison, Dummy From Feel Me, out August 28 via Friends Of Friends."It's the kind of brogue that'd set adrenaline streaking through your body if you heard it yelling after you down a dark alleyway, but here, the only threat of violence manifests in the still-sore "wounds on [your] back." It's a tale of knowing better next time offset by Marshall's turning-trademark cockiness: all, "See, girl…" and dedications to an oblique old guard, the only lineage in which Marshall seeks to establish himself." — Laura Snapes, Pitchfork From the Rock Bottom/Octopus 7 inch, out September 24 via Rinse."[T]he first single from the band’s sophomore album is “Die Life,” an exhilarating burst of release-less tension that pairs a “She Lost Control” shuffle with a jacked tempo and animalistic melodies." — Self-titled Mag From Zeros, out September 30 via Captured Tracks."This is the most eccentric and mellow collection of tunes Traxman has released yet-- if the hypermanic lullaby of "Da World Around Us" and his rework of Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" are any clues-- but it's another, almost undeserved peak into the mind of a juke giant, as well as a precursor to his forthcoming release on Lit City Trax. We can't help but be grateful for it." — Brad Stabler, Ad Hoc From Heat, out on Sewage Tapes.

Weekly Retrospect 32/12

10 Aug 2012 — NFOP

A selection of tracks you should’ve been listening to this past week, in the words of our friends."Listening to it just once doesn’t quite do it—Loscil’s music is based on subtle patterns, muffled keys repeat gradually under layers of gauzy hums, which a single listen could never fully convey. But on repeat 'Coyote' works like a choose your own adventure: different sounds branch out into these textural worlds endlessly." — Sam Hockley-Smith, The Fader From Sketches of New Brighton, out September 10 on Kranky."And though the delivery is sunny the tone and temperament of the surrounding songs have gotten darker, slanted more bittersweet than they've driven in the past. In turn, with the complex emotions the complexity of the arrangements has grown, but without ever becoming encumbered by ideas. No matter what the supporting cast, the shuffle of drums, the short strums and Earl's voice remain the gravitational point of any Woods album." — Andy French, Raven Sings The Blues From Bend Beyond, out in September on Woodsist."Greene keeps his trademark woozy R&B samples and light synth hooks as a central part of the sound while beefing up the low-end: every kick and bass pop hits harder than before." — Brad Stabler, Ad Hoc From the Ready EP, out on 3024."The song is a good indication that Kisses has changed its direction a bit. Though it contains an innate disco dance core, it also features tropical instrumentation, making the track more fitting played at a beach party than a night club." — Katrina Nattress, Prefix"The main attraction here, though, is a remix from analogue synth maven and DFA stalwart Gavin Russom. Russom re-imagines the song in cosmic slow-mo, a chugging behemoth over which Cohen’s voice takes on newfound diva qualities – one for the endless, erotic slowburn of some imagined Balearic terrace." — FACT From Cascading Keys, out on Olde English Spelling Bee."The first track to surface from the nine-track effort is the opener “Sleepwalker”, a psych-metal fusion comprised of pounding guitar grooves and fuzzed-out vocals." — Chris Coplan, Consequence Of Sound From Circles, out October 1 on Souterrain Transmissions.

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A selection of tracks you should’ve been listening to this past week, in the words of our friends."Listening to it just once doesn’t quite do it—Loscil’s music is based on subtle patterns, muffled keys repeat gradually under layers of gauzy hums, which a single listen could never fully convey. But on repeat 'Coyote' works like a choose your own adventure: different sounds branch out into these textural worlds endlessly." — Sam Hockley-Smith, The Fader From Sketches of New Brighton, out September 10 on Kranky."And though the delivery is sunny the tone and temperament of the surrounding songs have gotten darker, slanted more bittersweet than they've driven in the past. In turn, with the complex emotions the complexity of the arrangements has grown, but without ever becoming encumbered by ideas. No matter what the supporting cast, the shuffle of drums, the short strums and Earl's voice remain the gravitational point of any Woods album." — Andy French, Raven Sings The Blues From Bend Beyond, out in September on Woodsist."Greene keeps his trademark woozy R&B samples and light synth hooks as a central part of the sound while beefing up the low-end: every kick and bass pop hits harder than before." — Brad Stabler, Ad Hoc From the Ready EP, out on 3024."The song is a good indication that Kisses has changed its direction a bit. Though it contains an innate disco dance core, it also features tropical instrumentation, making the track more fitting played at a beach party than a night club." — Katrina Nattress, Prefix"The main attraction here, though, is a remix from analogue synth maven and DFA stalwart Gavin Russom. Russom re-imagines the song in cosmic slow-mo, a chugging behemoth over which Cohen’s voice takes on newfound diva qualities – one for the endless, erotic slowburn of some imagined Balearic terrace." — FACT From Cascading Keys, out on Olde English Spelling Bee."The first track to surface from the nine-track effort is the opener “Sleepwalker”, a psych-metal fusion comprised of pounding guitar grooves and fuzzed-out vocals." — Chris Coplan, Consequence Of Sound From Circles, out October 1 on Souterrain Transmissions.

Weekly Retrospect 31/12

03 Aug 2012 — NFOP

A selection of tracks you should’ve been listening to this past week."That focus on timing and subtlety helps to further empower the resonant drum patterns and disembodied choir that eventually join Howard in his lament, just before he pulls himself back as the spare instrumentation makes the composition's closing statements." — Patric Fallon, Pitchfork"It's more downtempo and strangely far more accessible than previous Teengirl Fantasy tracks, offering itself up as a sort of alt-dance jam that shimmers with vocal samples and various oddities." — Tom Walters, The 405The-Drum are the perfect foil to Fay's meticulously cut-up approach, smoothing things out but not without retaining the original's unsettling, lurching quality. — Tim Gentles, Rose Quartz"Under the thick cords, minuscule blips and bloops bubble up, exhibiting the kind of attention to detail that makes Fort Romeau's tunes exceptional." — Elissa Stolman, XLR8R"In a landscape crowded with electro-girls, Kolstad stands tall – her music teems with positivity, energy and spirit." — John Rogers, Snipe

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A selection of tracks you should’ve been listening to this past week."That focus on timing and subtlety helps to further empower the resonant drum patterns and disembodied choir that eventually join Howard in his lament, just before he pulls himself back as the spare instrumentation makes the composition's closing statements." — Patric Fallon, Pitchfork"It's more downtempo and strangely far more accessible than previous Teengirl Fantasy tracks, offering itself up as a sort of alt-dance jam that shimmers with vocal samples and various oddities." — Tom Walters, The 405The-Drum are the perfect foil to Fay's meticulously cut-up approach, smoothing things out but not without retaining the original's unsettling, lurching quality. — Tim Gentles, Rose Quartz"Under the thick cords, minuscule blips and bloops bubble up, exhibiting the kind of attention to detail that makes Fort Romeau's tunes exceptional." — Elissa Stolman, XLR8R"In a landscape crowded with electro-girls, Kolstad stands tall – her music teems with positivity, energy and spirit." — John Rogers, Snipe

Weekly Retrospect 30/12

27 Jul 2012 — NFOP

A selection of tracks you should've been listening to this past week."Here’s a new track from Montreal’s Solar Year, taken from the band’s otherworldly new LP Waverly, which was recently premiered underwater in an olympic-sized swimming pool. I’m guessing that was the ideal way to listen to this record, as the hymnal “Brotherhood” sounds a bit like a new age-y Silent Shout floating up from the ocean floor, featuring entrancing/ethereal guest vocals from the duo’s friend Grimes" — Chris Cantalini, Gorilla vs. Bear"Gobby's Lynchian version of 'Tree Drum' is a prime example of dark techno, with muddy synth beats permeated by gunshot-like percussives." — Emily Wheeler, Ad Hoc"Even though this was released in an instant, it’s a fluent expression of where Actress’s mind is, transported through the net for us all to hear" — Dummy"‘Money’ falls on the dreamy side of trap-influenced EDM, with a cooing sample of the word ‘money’ looped and contorted into a melody. Giraffage unleashes waves of body-vibrating bass and the type of snare programming that’s everywhere right now, before giving way to a very-EDM build and drop. It may not be timeless, but it’s a mover." — FACT"Today’s look comes from Washed Out, who sources “Straight Back,” the Nicks-fronted cut from 1982′s soft rocking, Tusk followup Mirage. In its original instance, the song has a smooth luster and dreamy mid-tempo dance pulse, which is to say it is apropos putty in Washed Out’s hands, who ratchets up the dance and gives it all a beachfront Balearic shimmer" — Amrit Singh, Stereogum"FAYE‘s amazingly beautiful single ‘Water Against The Rocks’ has had us swooning more than what’s healthy lately. Now it’s been reworked by fellow Stockholmers Museum of Bellas Artes, experts when it comes to making a remix completely different from the original, while keeping the bits that truly made it remix-worthy in the first place." — Oskar Christiansson, Ja Ja Ja Music"The song features stuttering beats and claustrophobic electronics, all tightly wound up with mutated vocals rapping 'Dumb luck, numb fuck/ Come out with your motherfucking hands up.' It’s freaky and suffocating and I love it." — Mr P, Tiny Mix Tapes"t’s only a matter of time before MPCs are introduced at Primary School and all the sweet cherub-like little children are banging out bass heavy tracks with creepy drums. That’s kind of what Happa’s doing here, with tracks like Secrets and Let It Go, Pearson Sound-esque vocals and percussions with twisted bassline flourishes." — Joe Bish, Abeano

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A selection of tracks you should've been listening to this past week."Here’s a new track from Montreal’s Solar Year, taken from the band’s otherworldly new LP Waverly, which was recently premiered underwater in an olympic-sized swimming pool. I’m guessing that was the ideal way to listen to this record, as the hymnal “Brotherhood” sounds a bit like a new age-y Silent Shout floating up from the ocean floor, featuring entrancing/ethereal guest vocals from the duo’s friend Grimes" — Chris Cantalini, Gorilla vs. Bear"Gobby's Lynchian version of 'Tree Drum' is a prime example of dark techno, with muddy synth beats permeated by gunshot-like percussives." — Emily Wheeler, Ad Hoc"Even though this was released in an instant, it’s a fluent expression of where Actress’s mind is, transported through the net for us all to hear" — Dummy"‘Money’ falls on the dreamy side of trap-influenced EDM, with a cooing sample of the word ‘money’ looped and contorted into a melody. Giraffage unleashes waves of body-vibrating bass and the type of snare programming that’s everywhere right now, before giving way to a very-EDM build and drop. It may not be timeless, but it’s a mover." — FACT"Today’s look comes from Washed Out, who sources “Straight Back,” the Nicks-fronted cut from 1982′s soft rocking, Tusk followup Mirage. In its original instance, the song has a smooth luster and dreamy mid-tempo dance pulse, which is to say it is apropos putty in Washed Out’s hands, who ratchets up the dance and gives it all a beachfront Balearic shimmer" — Amrit Singh, Stereogum"FAYE‘s amazingly beautiful single ‘Water Against The Rocks’ has had us swooning more than what’s healthy lately. Now it’s been reworked by fellow Stockholmers Museum of Bellas Artes, experts when it comes to making a remix completely different from the original, while keeping the bits that truly made it remix-worthy in the first place." — Oskar Christiansson, Ja Ja Ja Music"The song features stuttering beats and claustrophobic electronics, all tightly wound up with mutated vocals rapping 'Dumb luck, numb fuck/ Come out with your motherfucking hands up.' It’s freaky and suffocating and I love it." — Mr P, Tiny Mix Tapes"t’s only a matter of time before MPCs are introduced at Primary School and all the sweet cherub-like little children are banging out bass heavy tracks with creepy drums. That’s kind of what Happa’s doing here, with tracks like Secrets and Let It Go, Pearson Sound-esque vocals and percussions with twisted bassline flourishes." — Joe Bish, Abeano

Weekly Retrospect: 29/12

20 Jul 2012 — NFOP

The internet is a restless thing. Every single day of the year, it unleashes a vast amount of new music, and worst of all, a lot of this music is really exciting. Still crucially lacking interns (and for numerous other reasons, among them actually living an offline life), for us it sometimes feels hard to stay on top of things; we're obviously not even capable of writing about all the tracks we come across each week that fill us with true enthusiasm. That is not a problem in itself, as we do not aspire to cover the whole range of the latest in underground pop. However, we've observed a growing gap between the stuff we manage write about and all the new music we're also thrilled about and listen to the rest of our precious time, stuff that usually only (and perhaps rather surprisingly) surfaces when we compile our year-end lists. Hence this new weekly feature, which from now on will intend to summarize the past days' internet buzz that we've been into heavily, in the words of our esteemed friends from the world of internet music publishing.“'The Sound' kicks off with a looped sample of a quote from the Maharishi about transcendental meditation, before a breathless, love-dazed Ms. Juur launches into one of the warmer/brighter and more thoroughly intoxicating dance tracks we’ve heard from her thus far." - Chris Cantalini, Gorilla vs. Bear Will Happiness Find Me? is out September 4 via Not Not Fun."The title track from his new album Held [reveals] a song-structure and body impetus far in advance of his closest competitors, and manages to sound like this generation’s Belfast." - Charlie Robin Jones, Dummy Held is out August 27 via Tri Angle."Tom Krell’s wistful warble is clear and out front on 'Cold Nites', staring you dead-on over a skittering beat that’s broken up with cascades of glitter and a digital caw/yawn that recalls, vaguely, the recurring baby squeal in Aaliyah’s 'Are U That Somebody'. - Naomi Zeichner, Fader Total Loss is out September 17/18 via Acéphale (North America) and Weird World/Domino (row)."'Changes' is a belter of a pop song with a massive, unashamed hook: Things won’t change until we do / Things won’t change until we do. It’s the simplest of truths, the most obvious of cliches and that’s why it sticks, why it hits, and what makes it pop perfection." - Ruth Saxelby, Dummy The Changes EP is out on Friends Of Friends."It is opener ‘Ulysses’ that is the real standout here; an impossibly addictive track that pits Space Odyssee synths against triplet melodies and, at 2:16, an ENORMOUS bassy payoff." - Josh Hall, The Line Of Best Fit Aeolian is out July 30 via Civil Music."Hailing from Norway, a nation who’s brand of alt-pop music is oft overshadowed by the ever thriving black metal scene – Highasakite deliver a fresh and organic approach to their work and this first taster of their Indian Summer EP" - Richard Thane, The Line Of Best Fit Indian Summer EP is out August 20th via Riot Factory.

Read more →

The internet is a restless thing. Every single day of the year, it unleashes a vast amount of new music, and worst of all, a lot of this music is really exciting. Still crucially lacking interns (and for numerous other reasons, among them actually living an offline life), for us it sometimes feels hard to stay on top of things; we're obviously not even capable of writing about all the tracks we come across each week that fill us with true enthusiasm. That is not a problem in itself, as we do not aspire to cover the whole range of the latest in underground pop. However, we've observed a growing gap between the stuff we manage write about and all the new music we're also thrilled about and listen to the rest of our precious time, stuff that usually only (and perhaps rather surprisingly) surfaces when we compile our year-end lists. Hence this new weekly feature, which from now on will intend to summarize the past days' internet buzz that we've been into heavily, in the words of our esteemed friends from the world of internet music publishing.“'The Sound' kicks off with a looped sample of a quote from the Maharishi about transcendental meditation, before a breathless, love-dazed Ms. Juur launches into one of the warmer/brighter and more thoroughly intoxicating dance tracks we’ve heard from her thus far." - Chris Cantalini, Gorilla vs. Bear Will Happiness Find Me? is out September 4 via Not Not Fun."The title track from his new album Held [reveals] a song-structure and body impetus far in advance of his closest competitors, and manages to sound like this generation’s Belfast." - Charlie Robin Jones, Dummy Held is out August 27 via Tri Angle."Tom Krell’s wistful warble is clear and out front on 'Cold Nites', staring you dead-on over a skittering beat that’s broken up with cascades of glitter and a digital caw/yawn that recalls, vaguely, the recurring baby squeal in Aaliyah’s 'Are U That Somebody'. - Naomi Zeichner, Fader Total Loss is out September 17/18 via Acéphale (North America) and Weird World/Domino (row)."'Changes' is a belter of a pop song with a massive, unashamed hook: Things won’t change until we do / Things won’t change until we do. It’s the simplest of truths, the most obvious of cliches and that’s why it sticks, why it hits, and what makes it pop perfection." - Ruth Saxelby, Dummy The Changes EP is out on Friends Of Friends."It is opener ‘Ulysses’ that is the real standout here; an impossibly addictive track that pits Space Odyssee synths against triplet melodies and, at 2:16, an ENORMOUS bassy payoff." - Josh Hall, The Line Of Best Fit Aeolian is out July 30 via Civil Music."Hailing from Norway, a nation who’s brand of alt-pop music is oft overshadowed by the ever thriving black metal scene – Highasakite deliver a fresh and organic approach to their work and this first taster of their Indian Summer EP" - Richard Thane, The Line Of Best Fit Indian Summer EP is out August 20th via Riot Factory.